Fall Word of Mouth

Kids’ TV: Carmen Sandiego — Duane Capizzi (Netflix)

Fiction: A Murder of Magpies — Judith Flanders

Non-Fiction: Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup — John Carreyrou

Science: The Ghost Map — Steven Johnson

More Kids’ TV: Beat Bugs — Josh Wakely (Netflix)

Ancient Inspiration:

“If a person gave your body to any stranger he met on his way, you would certainly be angry. And do you feel no shame in handing over your own mind to be confused and mystified by anyone who happens to verbally attack you?”

— Epictetus — Enchiridion 28, translated by Elizabeth Carter

Not-so-Ancient Inspiration: 

“The faith that led Magellan to attempt to circumnavigate the globe in 1519 is why we remember him. But few remember that he was not among the eighteen survivors who completed the journey.”

Midsummer Word of Mouth

Fiction: The Snakes — Sadie Jones

Fiction: The Last Book Party – Karen Dukess

Fiction: Fleishman Is In Trouble — Taffy Brodesser-Akner

Science: Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond — Sonia Shah 

TV: False Flag — Maria Feldman, Amit Cohen. Hulu

Movie: I Am Not Your Negro  — Raoul Peck, James Baldwin. Amazon

 

Ancient Inspiration: “… [N]o act is honourable that is done by an unwilling agent, that is compulsary. Every honourable act is voluntary.”

— Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Epistle 66. From Epistles, 66-92, Translation by Richard Gummere. Loeb Classical Library.

 

 

Early Summer Word of Mouth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memoir:  Good Talk — Mira Jacob

Non-Fiction: White Fragility Robin Diangelo

Science: The Gene: An Intimate History Siddhartha Mukherjee

Movie: Amazing Grace  — Alan Elliott and Sidney Pollack

Movie: Book Smart Olivia Wilde

 

Not-So-Ancient Inspiration:

“It doesn’t matter how far ahead you see if you don’t understand what you are looking at.” — Garry Kasparov

September Word of Mouth

Movie: RBG – Julie Cohen and Betsy West

Memoir: Negroland – Margo Jefferson

TV: Imposters – Paul Adelstein and Adam Brooks

Fiction: Magpie Murders – Anthony Horowitz

Ancient Inspiration:

“The work is quite feasible, and is the only thing in our power…. Let go of the past. We must only begin. Believe me and you will see.” – Epictetus, Discourses, 2.19.29-34

May Word of Mouth

Fiction: The Talented Ribkins– Ladee Hubbard

 

Workshop: Undoing Racism — The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond

 

Parenting: Mamaleh Knows Best: What Jewish Mothers Do To Raise Successful, Creative, Empathetic and Independent Children — Marjorie Ingall 

 

History: Operation Mincemeat — Ben Macintyre

 

TV: Capital — BBC via Acorn via Amazon

 

Ancient Inspiration:

“Difficulties are things that show what men are. For the future, in case of any difficulty, remember that God, like a gymnastic trainer, has pitted you against a rough antagonist. For what end? That you may be an Olympic conqueror; and this cannot be without toil. No man, in my opinion, has a more profitable difficulty on his hands than you have, provided you will but use it, as an athletic champion uses his antagonist.”

Epictetus, Discourses, Book 1, Chapter 24.

 

Seneca on Saturday — a good-humoured stomach

Third Century CE mosaic of a baker, from a series of scenes from the agricultural calendar at St. Romain-en-Gal, exhibited at the National Archaeological Museum of France, in Saint German-en-Laye. Photo courtesy of M. Fuller.

CVIII. On the conflict between pleasure and virtue

It is necessary that one grow accustomed to slender fare: because there are many problems of time and place which will cross the path of even of the rich man and one equipped for pleasure, and bring him up with a round turn. To have whatsoever he wishes is in no man’s power; it is in his power not to wish for what he has not, but cheerfully to employ what comes to him. A great step towards independence is a good-humoured stomach, one that is willing to endure rough treatment.

Seneca Epistles 93-124, Translation by Richard Gummere. Loeb Classical Library.